Bibliography: Honduras (page 09 of 15)

This bibliography is selected and organized by the Hondureinas website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Fernando M. Reimers, Walter A. Montgomery, Washington National Association for Foreign Student Affairs, Gavin W. Jones, Jerold D. Bozarth, Inc. World Eagle, JoAnn Crandall, Margaret Legowski, St. Louis Harris-Stowe State Coll, and Robert F. Arnove.

International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England). (1973). Situation Report–Antigua, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Philippines, Ryukyu Islands, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent. Data relating to population and family planning in nine foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are: Antigua, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Philippines, Ryukyu Islands (Okinawa), St. Lucia, and St. Vincent. Information is provided under two topics, general background and family planning situation, where appropriate and if it is available. General background covers ethnic groups, language, religion, economy, communication/education, medical/social welfare, and statistics on population, birth and death rates. Family planning situation considers family planning associations and personnel, government attitudes, legislation, family planning services, education/information, training opportunities for individuals, families, and medical personnel, research and evaluation, program plans, government programs, and related supporting organizations. Bibliographic sources are given.   [More]  Descriptors: Contraception, Demography, Family Planning, Foreign Countries

National Association for Foreign Student Affairs, Washington, DC. (1981). The Handbook on the Placement of Foreign Graduate Students (Graduate Handbook, Part II). Information on the educational systems of 52 foreign countries and recommendations for student placement into U.S. graduate programs are presented. For each country a diagram is presented to illustrate the demarcations between primary, secondary, and tertiary levels, and explanations are provided on grading systems, secondary school certificates, teacher's certificates, and various types of degrees. Variations among different schools, states, or territories regarding certificates/degrees and grading methods are indicated. The following countries are covered: Afghanistan, Algeria, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Canada (and the provinces), China, Colombia, Cyprus, Egypt, Ethiopia, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Kuwait, Laos, Liberia, Malaysia, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Philipines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Turkey, and Venezuela. Descriptors: Certification, Comparative Education, Degrees (Academic), Elementary Secondary Education

Reimers, Fernando; McGinn, Noel (1997). Informed Dialogue: Using Research to Shape Education Policy Around the World. This book is about how the process of deciding about education, or education policymaking, can be informed by research-based knowledge. Part 1 offers three chapters that attempt to clarify the central issues caught up in the problem of knowledge utilization–why there is so little utilization of research in educational policymaking, how research should be conducted, the ways in which policymaking has been conceptualized, and the actors involved in the policymaking process. Three chapters in part 2 lay out the major perspectives on utilization of research knowledge in education–policy dialogue as communication and persuasion, as negotiation, and as participation and organizational learning. The six chapters in part 3 present case studies of research utilization in educational policymaking as they occurred in Colombia, Egypt, El Salvador, Honduras, Namibia, and Paraguay. Part 4, the concluding chapter, lays the foundation for a heuristic model that identifies nine situations, or moments of action, for educational change. (Contains 167 references). Descriptors: Educational Change, Educational Policy, Elementary Secondary Education, Foreign Countries

Evans, Thomas J.; Traylor, Stacy L. (1997). A Developmentally Appropriate Honduran/International Primary School Computer Curriculum. Students and teachers need to develop skills in using available technological capacities. The curriculum described here is designed to familiarize students and teachers with equipment and software available at the Escuela Internacional Sampedrana's Primary School (EIS) in Honduras. Key features of the curriculum include the use of the Internet and e-mail; grade level developmental activities including word processing, typing, painting/drawing, and spreadsheet/database programs; teacher training suggestions; and an overview on web page construction. This document begins by describing EIS administration, educational philosophy, teachers, primary school academic program, and educational goals, as well as the history of the computer laboratory. It then presents a general overview of the computer curriculum objectives for grades 1 through 6 and student evaluation methods. For each grade level, specific learning objectives, instructional strategies, and evaluation methods are described. Sample lesson plans are also included. Contains 9 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Class Activities, Computer Graphics, Computer Literacy, Computer Mediated Communication

Fink, Marcy; Arnove, Robert F. (1989). Current Issues and Tensions in Popular Education in Latin America. Popular education issues in Latin America–particularly issues manifested in work with women–are examined. Observations are based on work with health education projects in Chile and a regional community organizing program in Honduras, Costa Rica, and Guatemala, as well as research into the impact of popular education programs on Latin American women overall. The case study of Nicaragua was selected to determine to what extent a similar pattern of tensions exists. The six tensions discussed are: (1) methodology vs. content; (2) micro- vs. macro-level focus; (3) reinforcing traditional gender roles or altering them; (4) women-only vs. mixed groups; (5) alternative sector vs. work within the system; and (6) quality vs. quantity. Popular education in Nicaragua is tied to a national political project that aims at the transformation of society. The impact of popular education programs is discussed on an individual level, group level, national level, and the macro level. (24 references)   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Strategies, Educational Trends, Elementary Secondary Education, Foreign Countries

Reimers, Fernando M. (1991). Is Jomtien Irrelevant to Latin America? Adjusting Education While Adjusting the Economy. Development Discussion Paper No. 388-ES. This paper challenges the commonly held view that Latin America has solved its access problems to primary education. The consequences of this view would be that the policy recommendations of the World Conference on Education for All, held in Jomtien, Thailand, in 1990 would be less applicable to Latin America than to Africa or Asia. The first part of the paper documents how education in Latin America today is characterized by low levels of learning, severe inequities in opportunities to learn, and high repetition rates. The second section examines the changes in the provision of education, which resulted from the impact of adjustment on households, education finance, schools, and ministries of education. The last section of the paper proposes five ideas for an education reform agenda: (1) the need for more resources at the basic levels; (2) a renewed sense of purpose for education, focusing on equity and quality; (3) a recognition that quality is not a uni-dimensional concept; (4) information as a central resource guide and monitor change; and (5) institutionalization of mechanisms for strategic planning, policy continuity, and policy change. The paper draws on information collected from: a survey of education policymakers in Latin America; conversations with educators and policymakers in trips to Colombia, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela; and a survey of 64 rural teachers, 1,250 students and 640 mothers in Honduras as well as documents referenced in the text.   [More]  Descriptors: Access to Education, Educational Assessment, Educational Economics, Educational Improvement

Legowski, Margaret (1992). Destination: Honduras. Study Guide. This study guide was developed by the Peace Corps' Office of World Wise Schools. The aim of the guide is to promote better understanding of other people on the part of the people of the United States. Teachers can use the book to supplement the study of Central America or the environment. Using the materials, students will learn to: (1) identify similarities and differences between their lives and the lives of young people in another country; (2) apply geographic themes to the country of Honduras; and (3) research the geography and culture of a Peace Corps volunteer's hoist country. A unit for grades 3 through 5 focuses on the geographic themes of location, place, and relationships within places. The latter two themes are also the subject of units for grades 6 through 9 and 10 through 12. Each of the units includes information for teachers and worksheets. Sixty-three references and a list of people and organizations that provided information for the study guide are attached. Descriptors: Area Studies, Elementary Secondary Education, Geographic Concepts, Geography Instruction

Munroe, Gretel S.; Jones, Gavin W. (1971). Reports on Population/Family Planning, Number Ten. Mobile Units in Family Planning. Use and effectiveness of mobile units in family planning programs of several foreign countries are surveyed in this demographic report. Services and education provided by mobile unit programs in Tunisia, the United Arab Republic, Honduras, South Korea, Turkey, and Pakistan are examined. Assessed are the various roles mobile units play, their functions, geographic coverage, continuity of care, types of vehicles, methods of operation, personnel, costs, and program strengths and weaknesses. Comparisons among programs in different countries are made where possible. Systematic analysis of cost-effectiveness of the programs is provided in statistical and narrative form. Several tables indicate team performance for the various countries and include raw data for individual teams as well as median figures for all units within the country. Information was obtained primarily from questionnaires distributed by the Population Council in November, 1967. Descriptors: Cost Effectiveness, Demography, Family Planning, Foreign Countries

World Eagle, Inc., Wellesley, MA. (1986). Latin America Today: An Atlas of Reproducible Pages. A profile of Latin America (defined as consisting of the countries of Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela) emerges from this collection of black and white illustrative maps, tables, and graphs. Depicted are Latin America's: size, population, resources, commodities, trade, cities, schooling, jobs, energy, industry, demographic statistics, food and agriculture, and aspects of national governments. Twenty individual country maps produced by the United States Department of State are also included, and an article by William H. McNeil entitled "A Background: How Columbus Remade the World," provides insights on how Columbus's voyages shaped the modern world. The volume is designed to be used by classroom teachers and curriculum developers as a compendium of teaching resources. Descriptors: Agriculture, Area Studies, Atlases, Demography

Crandall, JoAnn; And Others (1985). English Language Assessment in Central America. This document, the final report of a project assessing the general status of English language training (ELT) in Central America, includes an overview of the process, general recommendations, and country-specific information and recommendations for training and policy development. The purpose was to assess the potential effects of the ELT situation on the Central American Peace Scholarship (CAPS) Program, a technical training exchange program with the United States. The major recommendations are for the improvement of in-country and U.S. preparatory training for CAPS program participants through the use of consultants in program development, immersion instruction, and independent study; and for the improvement of national ELT programs through improved materials, teacher training seminars and national ELT policy. Specific recommendations are also made for Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Costa Rica, and Panama, and special reports containing recommendations for establishing a regional center for ELT are included for Belize and the Regional Office for Central American Programs.   [More]  Descriptors: Educational Assessment, Educational Objectives, English (Second Language), Foreign Countries

Montgomery, Walter A. (1920). Some Phases of Educational Progress in Latin America. Bulletin, 1919, No. 59, Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior. This bulletin discusses the phases of educational progress in Latin America. The following topic areas are covered: (1) Central America (practical education; Guatemala; Salvador; Honduras; Costa Rica; Nicaragua; Panama); (2) British Guiana (new school regulation); (3) Argentina (preliminary; illiteracy; report of National Council of Education; progress of education in the Provinces; changes under the projected law of 1918; secondary education; technical education; normal-school training; higher education); (4) Brazil (vocational education); (5) Chile (preliminary; illiteracy; primary education; secondary education; training of teachers; technical education); (6) Uruguay (general introduction; primary education, public and private; rural schools; medical inspection of schools; secondary education; commercial education; training of teachers; higher education); and (7) Venezuela. (Contains 2 footnotes.) [Best copy available has been provided.]   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Aspiration, Higher Education, Business Education, Educational Development

National Association for Foreign Student Affairs, Washington, DC. (1981). The Handbook on the Placement of Foreign Graduate Students (Graduate Handbook, Part I). Information on the educational systems of 52 foreign countries is presented, and recommendations for student placement into U.S. graduate programs are given in this first of a two-part handbook. For each country a diagram illustrates the demarcation between primary, secondary, and tertiary levels, and explanations are provided on grading systems, levels, secondary school certificates, teacher's certificates, and various types of degrees. Variations among different schools, states, or territories regarding certificates/degrees and grading methods are indicated. The following countries are covered: Afghanistan, Algeria, Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Canada (and the provinces), China, Colombia, Cyprus, Egypt, Ethiopia, Finland, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Kuwait, Laos, Liberia, Malaysia, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Turkey, and Venezuela. Descriptors: Certification, College Students, Comparative Education, Degrees (Academic)

Bozarth, Jerold D., Ed.; And Others (1971). Abstracts of Research in Rehabilitation. The Top Twenty-One Research Selections by the 1970-1971 Research Awards Committee. This monograph was designed to disseminate the results of recent scientific research in rehabilitation counseling and related areas. The 21 abstracts reflect the research currently underway in universities, rehabilitation facilities, and rehabilitation research institutes throughout the country. Sample topics include: (1) "A Descriptive Study of Supervisory Practices as Perceived by Counselors in State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies," (2) "The Effects of Oxygen Inhalation on Motor Impersistence in Brain-Damaged Individuals: A Double Blind Study," (3) "A Guttman Facet Theory Analysis of Teacher Attitudes Toward the Mentally Retarded in Columbia, British Honduras, and the United States," (4) "Repeated Measures and the Evaluation of Change in the Individual Client During Counseling," and (5) "Environment As a Network of Judgments Regarding Staff Roles." Research projects which have won awards are noted in the document. Descriptors: Abstracts, Cognitive Measurement, Counselor Attitudes, Job Satisfaction

Harris-Stowe State Coll., St. Louis, MO. Teacher Education Dept. (1994). Educating the Special Child in the Caribbean and Central America. This paper represents the perspectives of 25 special education teacher scholarship students from 13 Caribbean and Central American countries (Barbados, Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nevis, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Dominica, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Jamaica, Grenada, and Antigua) on the status of special education in their countries in the areas of funding, legislation, identification, and programming. Specific sections of the report address the following aspects of special education in this geographical area: disability prevalence, legislation, funding, identification and placement, programs, teacher training, services, other factors affecting special education in the Caribbean and Central America, public awareness, attitudes, government barriers, poverty, and new directions for the 21st century. Appendices include a listing of general areas of concern about special education in the Caribbean and Central America, and specific information about St. Christopher and Nevis, Barbados, Belize, and Jamaica.   [More]  Descriptors: Comparative Education, Delivery Systems, Developing Nations, Disabilities

International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England). (1971). Situation Report–Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Greece, Honduras, Irish Republic, Malta, Romania, Spain, U.S.S.R. Data relating to population and family planning in ten foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Greece, Honduras, Irish Republic, Malta, Romania, Spain, and the U.S.S.R. Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two topics, general background and family planning situation. General background covers ethnic groups, language, religion, economy, communication/education, medical/social welfare, and statistics on population, birth and death rates. Family planning situation considers family planning associations and personnel, government attitudes, legislation, family planning services, education/information, sex education, training opportunities for individuals, families, and medical personnel, program plans, government plans, and related supporting organizations. Bibliographic sources are given.   [More]  Descriptors: Contraception, Demography, Family Planning, Foreign Countries

Leave a Reply