Bibliography: Honduras (page 12 of 15)

This annotated bibliography is reformatted and customized for the Hondureinas website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Bonnie J. Brownlee, Carl Crozier, Lynn Holland, George R. Waggoner, New York Institute of International Education, New York Community Development Foundation, Bruce Garrison, WILLIAM G. RHOADS, Barbara Ashton Waggoner, and Motilal Sharma.

Holland, Lynn (1987). The Principle of Cognitive Consistency and Central American Policy: A Comparison of the Carter and Reagan Administrations. The principle of cognitive consistency, formulated by Jack Snyder, explains decision-making under stressful conditions. Snyder contends that decision-making under stressful conditions creates a drive toward cognitive consistency and brings into operation tendencies: (1) toward a perception of certainty about an opponent's intention and the righteousness of one's own position; (2) toward perceiving the principal values in the situation as consistent rather than inconsistent; and (3) toward adopting a strategy of compellance rather than negotiation. A revised model of this principle is used to evaluate foreign policy toward Central America during the Reagan administration and to contrast it with that of the Carter administration. Critical events preceding Reagan's election produced uncertainty in foreign affairs during his administration. Under Reagan, aid to El Salvador and Honduras increased dramatically and three new Central American countries received increased aid. The Carter administration was marked by a more analytical model of decision-making as exemplified by the policy on human rights. A "normalization" of the situation in Central America should bring about the return of analytical decision-making, according to this model. The signing of the Arias Peace Plan and the tentative negotiations which followed suggest that watchful accommodation will replace the current policy of military intervention. Thirty-one footnotes are included and an appendix provides a series of graphs and charts Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Foreign Countries, Foreign Policy, International Relations

Sharma, Motilal (1985). Distance Education: Professional Staff Paper. This paper examines the relevance and cost-effectiveness of the use of mass media for spreading education and the dissemination of information needed to sustain growth and technological progress in developing countries. An overview of experiments with the use of radio and television for educational purposes provides brief descriptions of distance education projects in the USSR, the United Kingdom, Niger, Honduras, Rwanda, Nicaragua, the United States, India, Australia, and Malaysia, and notes related activities in other countries. Discussion of the economics of distance education focuses on issues raised by case studies on the cost-effectiveness of distance education in various countries. Prospects and issues in the field are then discussed in the context of: (1) primary and secondary education; (2) teacher education; (3) education management and administration; (4) tertiary education; and (5) nonformal education. A brief review of the Asian Development Bank's involvement in distance education concludes this paper. Sources of additional information on the projects described and the case studies cited are indicated in footnotes.   [More]  Descriptors: Cost Effectiveness, Developing Nations, Distance Education, Educational Administration

Brownlee, Bonnie J. (1988). Conducting Evaluation Research Abroad: Some Things They Don't Exactly Tell You. This paper chronicles the anecdotal evidence of unexpected problems that emerged in two mass communication projects in Central America. The aim is to highlight the most salient "people-related" issues faced by mass communication evaluation researchers who work in alien cultures. The paper argues that graduate students in schools of journalism and mass communication are well trained in theory, methods, and statistical analysis but are not so well prepared to deal with the obstacles put up by people and the organizations they represent in field settings. The paper states that this problem is particularly true for those who intend to work in evaluation research in developing countries. The two projects discussed in the paper dealt with non-formal community educational radio and were located in isolated regions of Nicaragua and Honduras. Personal experiences of the author during these projects are recounted while observations drawn from literature that addresses evaluation research are integrated in the text. The paper makes the case that the field of journalism and mass communication needs to prepare graduates better to handle these "people-related" issues. (Thirteen notes are included.) Descriptors: Cultural Context, Developing Nations, Evaluation, Field Studies

Oklahoma City Public School System, OK. (1970). BAM Social Studies Supplement: Why Do Nations Engage in World Trade?. This nongraded resource unit was prepared to give the teacher examples of social studies activities that emphasize economic concepts. It presupposes some knowledge of economics, therefore it is not designed primarily for younger children. The major themes are: producing, distributing, and consuming food, clothing, shelter, and services. Canada, United States, Mexico, Honduras, and Brazil are specifically considered. On the question of world trade, it is assumed that people are interdependent and must help each other in obtaining and providing goods and services. The major question is followed by four subproblems: 1) what evidence of world trade do we find in our homes; 2) what are the productive resouces necessary to provide goods for world trade; 3) how does market determine what products are imported and exported; and, 4) how do governmental policies influence trade among nations? Within each of these problem areas, the format includes: specific questions, related concepts, behavioral objectives, techniques for assessment, and resource materials. For the teachers convenience, alternative or supplementary materials, and two charts are included.   [More]  Descriptors: Behavioral Objectives, Concept Teaching, Curriculum, Economics

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean. (1987). Seminario Regional para el Desarrollo de Materiales Educativos para la Paz (San Jose, Costa Rica, 27-31 de octubre de 1986). Informe Final (Regional Seminar for the Development of Educational Materials on the Theme of Peace–San Jose, Costa Rica, October 27-31, 1986. Final Report). In conjunction with United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's 40th anniversary, 1986 was named the International Year of Peace. During 1986, UNESCO selected the theme "peace" as an education project to be undertaken in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Venezuela. The development of educational materials that would seek to emphasize new methods of teaching about peace, while emphasizing each country's economic, social, political, and cultural uniqueness, was stressed. Materials were produced by each country and a conference was convened to: (1) investigate, develop, apply, and evaluate the suggested materials and teaching methods; (2) improve teachers' knowledge and skills in relation to peace activities; and (3) stimulate peace awareness through specific daily activities. Results of the peace projects indicate an increased awareness of and interest in peace education and a desire to exchange materials, ideas, and teaching methods. Recommendations for future activities are described, and appendices include the conference program, a participant list, and welcoming speeches. Descriptors: Class Activities, Content Analysis, Course Content, Curriculum Development

Garrison, Bruce; Munoz, Julio E. (1985). An Update of Freedom of the Press and Information in Latin America and the Caribbean. This paper is based on a review of the literature that included reports from the Inter-American Press Association's general assembly in Los Angeles in October 1984, the mid-year meeting of the Inter-American Press Association in Panama City in March 1985, and the 1983 world press freedom review of the International Press Institute. Other material is adapted from the Index on Censorship and the Committee to Protect Journalists Update No. 10 (January-February 1984). The paper examines the current status of freedom of the press and information in Latin America and the Caribbean. Among the nations discussed are Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Netherland Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Surinam, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The paper concludes by noting that the status of freedom of the press and of information is improving in the area, as is evident in (1) return of democracy in Argentina, (2) end of total censorship in Uruguay, and (3) maintenance of democracy in the three traditional democratic countries of Venezuela, Colombia, and Costa Rica.   [More]  Descriptors: Censorship, Democracy, Foreign Countries, Freedom of Speech

Waggoner, Barbara Ashton; Waggoner, George R. (1986). Universities of the Caribbean Region–Struggles to Democratize. An Annotated Bibliography. An annotated bibliography on universities in the Caribbean region for the period since World War II is presented. The focus is on access to universities. For book citations, each annotation contains the author's name, publication title, place of publication, publisher, date, and number of pages. Journal references consist of author, title of article, name of journal, volume number, date, and page numbers. Newspapers, monographs, and other periodicals are also included. The first section, which covers 329 publications, is a general coverage on universities. Annotations are also provided on 172 publications on the University of West Indies. The remainder of the bibliography covers countries/areas. The countries/areas and number of publications for each are as follows: Colombia (83), Costa Rica (90), Cuba (166), Dominican Republic (96), French Antilles (59), Guyana (55), Haiti (16), Honduras (25), Mexico (38), Netherlands Antilles (21), Nicaragua (74), Panama (75), Puerto Rico (83), U.S. Virgin Islands (7), and Venezuela (213). Appended are a list of foreign periodicals and an author index. Descriptors: Access to Education, Annotated Bibliographies, College Attendance, Developing Nations

Tanodi, Aurelio (1985). The Status of Archivists in Relation to Other Information Professionals in the Public Service in Latin America. This study is intended to promote the development of the archival and records management professions in Latin America by providing basic data on the status of professionals in this area in relation to other information professionals in the public service, particularly librarians and documentalists. It deals with the basic issues of recruitment, training, employment qualifications, conditions of service, remuneration, legal rules, and career opportunities. In preparation for the study, a questionnaire was mailed to the heads of the national or general archives of concerned countries. Replies were received from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, the Dominican Republic, and Uruguay. In addition information was sought from archivist schools and faculties. For the first time, this document provides basic data in a number of these areas that can be used to support efforts to upgrade the status of archivists and their colleagues in the information field in Latin America. A bibliography is included. Appendices include the letter to heads of national archives, the questionnaire, a list of individuals who answered the questionnaires, and replies from Bolivia and Haiti. Descriptors: Archives, Career Education, Career Planning, Developing Nations

Institute of International Education, New York, NY. (1986). Regional Education Profile: Central America. Profiles of the educational systems in the seven Central American countries are presented, along with an introductory essay by Rene Greenwald, "Higher Education in Central America: Trends and Developments: 1985-86." Country profiles are provided for Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. For each country, an overview of the elementary/secondary and postsecondary system is presented, along with descriptions of specific colleges and universities and information on student placement in the U.S. university system. Teacher training and sources of financial aid for overseas study are also briefly reviewed in the profiles. Sources of information on U.S. education in each country are also identified, and glossaries of terms are included. The essay identifies 18 trends developing in Central America and indicates how U.S. institutions can begin to respond to regional development needs. Trends include: emphasis on the development of in-country, graduate-level programs; continuing demand for university and technical-level training; increased tuition fees at public universities; and the prospect that financial aid for study abroad will focus on fields that are not offered domestically and are a priority for national development, especially at the graduate level. Descriptors: Case Studies, Educational Trends, Elementary Secondary Education, Foreign Countries

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). International Inst. for Educational Planning. (1967). NEW EDUCATIONAL MEDIA IN ACTION–CASE STUDIES FOR PLANNERS–III. THIS IS A COLLECTION OF CASE STUDIES ON THE USE OF TELEVISION, RADIO, FILMSTRIPS, AND CORRESPONDENCE STUDY–ALONE, OR IN COMBINATION–FOR INSTRUCTION, EDUCATIONAL EXTENSION, AND ADULT EDUCATION IN SIX COUNTRIES–ITALY (ETV), NIGER (RADIO AND RADIO PLUS FILMSTRIPS), NEW ZEALAND (RADIO PLUS CORRESPONDENCE), HONDURAS (RADIO), NIGERIA (ETV), AND USA (MPATI–AIRBORNE ITV). EACH STUDY RECOUNTS THE PROJECT'S HISTORY, ORGANIZATION, OPERATION, COSTS, AND EVIDENCE OF EFFECTIVENESS. THIS EVIDENCE IS BY AND LARGE FAVORABLE, THOUGH WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE MPATI, LARGELY INCORRECT–BASED ON ATTITUDES OF PARTICIPATING TEACHERS AND RADIO CLUB LEADERS, IMPRESSIONS OF VISITORS, OR PROPORTIONS OF STUDENTS WHO PASSED LITERACY EXAMINATIONS OR WHO TRANSFERRED WITH NO DIFFICULTIES TO REGULAR SCHOOLS.  THE COST ANALYSES REFLECT THE HIGH AND VARIABLE COSTS OF INTRODUCING AND MAINTAINING THE NEW MEDIA AND INCLUDE EXTRAPOLATIONS OF PRESENT COSTS TO THE OPTIMUM SITUATION WHERE THE ECONOMIES OF SCALE ARE EXPLOITED TO THE FULL. A RECURRENT THEME IN THE CASE STUDIES ON THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IS THE NEED TO INTERGRATE THE NEW MEDIA WITHIN THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM. MOST OF THE DIFFICULTIES NOTED SEEM TO STEM FROM THE SYSTEM'S INABILITY TO PROVIDE THE NECESSARY RESOURCE BASE. THIS DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE FROM UNESCO, PLACE DE FONTENOY, 75 PARIS-7E, FRANCE, FOR $4.50. Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Communications Satellites, Correspondence Study, Costs

Whiteside, Daniel F.; And Others (1978). Health Manpower Planning: A Comparative Study in Four Countries. Volume 1. Health Manpower References. The health manpower planning experiences of four countries reported here were presented in a traveling seminar held for member countries of the Pan American Health Organization. Focus was on what should be carried out in any country to coordinate the training of health workers with the operation of health services. Following the introduction, the content is presented in six chapters. The first one, on the process and background of manpower planning, covers the role of governments, government-university relationships, government structure, and health planning. Chapter 2 discusses the phases in manpower planning, such as analyzing the manpower training and use situation, analyzing the health care system, determining the health and education needs of the population, identifying issues, formulating a health manpower policy and plan, executing the plan, and evaluating the results. The remaining four chapters describe the planning modalities in Columbia, Ecuador, Honduras, and the United States, with each chapter covering the following: the country and its population, health conditions, health services, human and physical health care resources, national health policy, health manpower policy, health manpower units and their programs, and the future. Conclusions and recommendations are presented at the end of this report. Descriptors: Conference Reports, Cooperative Programs, Coordination, Delivery Systems

Community Development Foundation, New York, NY. (1968). International Community Development Statistical Bulletin. Spring 1968 General Edition. The Spring 1968 general edition of the International Community Development Statistical Bulletin describes its reporting system based on the International Standard Classification of Community Development Activities and a special project registration and progress form; briefly summarizes overall international data; and presents statistics on programs in Bolivia, the Dominican Republic, France, Greece, Honduras, India, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, Taiwan, Tanzania, the United States, and Viet Nam. Data are reported on public works, agriculture, education, health, welfare, housing, industry and commerce, and miscellaneous topics. Main categories into which these data are organized include economic analyses, public information, time-dependent information (program trends and progress for given periods or from inception to the present time), geographic areas (zones or communities), social progress and intangible values, and reports by field workers. The tables are grouped by country, alphabetically, with each section preceded by a brief summary of the highlights of the program covered. Tables and summaries in Spanish are followed by English translations, or have bilingual headings. Descriptors: Agriculture, Business, Classification, Community Benefits

Crozier, Carl (1986). Soil Conservation Techniques for Hillside Farms. A Guide for Peace Corps Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Reprint Series No. R-62. This guide provides agricultural extensionists with basic information that will help them design plans for the conservation of soils and the management of water runoff in specific agricultural plots. It is based on experiences with small hillside farms in Honduras and takes into account the resources and constraints commonly encountered there. Following the introduction are three sections on soil conservation: traditional Honduran farming techniques and resulting problems, soil conservation strategies, and soil fertility and its maintenance. Section V on extension methodology includes some sample work activities, guidelines for evaluating work, motivating techniques, and types of groups with which one may be involved. A conclusion precedes a listing of suggested references and the following appendixes: an English-Spanish vocabulary list, dichotomous key to the selection of soil conservation practices, results of the Santa Cruz Extension Project, instructions for two simple levels for use in surveying contour lines, and some demonstrations useful in promoting new techniques. Eight tables and 46 figures are provided throughout the text of the guide.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Agricultural Education, Agriculture, Conservation Education

Spain, Peter L.; And Others (1977). Radio for Education and Development: Case Studies, Volume II. World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 266. Use of radio for nonformal education and development communications and the technical and economic considerations related to radio services are covered in this second volume of case studies on use of radio for education and development. Under radio and nonformal education are: an evaluation of radio schools as part of the popular promotion strategy of rural development in Honduras (focusing on adult basic education–literacy, health, arithmetic, agriculture–leadership training, and community organization); a report on harnessing radio to mass educational campaigns in Tanzania from first efforts to the massive health education campaign in 1973 (based on a radio series, supporting printed materials, organized radio study groups); a description of a pilot project in Senegal coupling rural educational radio programs to community listening and feedback; an explanation of three paradigms for open broadcast educational radio (top-down and bottom-up communication and a synthesis of the two); and guidelines for radio forums as a rural development strategy. Under radio for development communications are case studies on community use of radio in the Canadian North and interactive radio for health care and education in Alaska. A final section covers technical and economic considerations that should go into planning radio services in order to attain development goals. Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Literacy, Agricultural Education, Case Studies

RHOADS, WILLIAM G.; AND OTHERS (1963). USE OF RADIOPHONIC TEACHING IN FUNDAMENTAL EDUCATION. A PILOT STUDY WAS CONDUCTED IN EL SALVADOR AND HONDURAS TO TEST THE FEASIBILITY OF MULTINATIONAL EVALUATION OF THE RADIOPHONIC SCHOOL SYSTEM IN LATIN AMERICA. RADIO SCHOOL PROGRAMS WERE EXAMINED IN TERMS OF THEIR EFFECT ON PARTICIPANT ACHIEVEMENT, SATISFACTION, AND APPLICATION OF ACQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE. ATTITUDINAL, SOCIAL, AND CULTURAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE SUBJECT STUDENTS AND THEIR SCHOOL GROUP LEADERS, MONITORS, AND ADMINISTRATORS, AS WELL AS ANY SPECIFIED LIMITS WITHIN WHICH THESE SCHOOLS MUST OPERATE WERE INVESTIGATED. INTERVIEW DATA WERE GATHERED FROM A SELECTED SAMPLE OF ADULT STUDENTS (PRESENT AND DROPOUT, 15 YEARS OF AGE OR OVER), AND REPRESENTATIVES AND MONITORS OF THE SCHOOLS. THE FINDINGS OF THE SUBJECT SURVEY WERE COVERED UNDER FOUR MAJOR TOPICS–(1) STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT RELATIVE TO LITERACY, GENERAL ATTITUDINAL AND BEHAVIOR PATTERNS, AND OTHER INDIVIDUAL STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS, AND THE EFFECT OF SCHOOL AND CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT ON THESE CHARACTERISTICS, (2) STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN AREAS OUTSIDE OF SCHOOL AND KNOWLEDGE APPLICATIONS, (3) STUDENT SATISFACTION WITH RADIOPHONIC EDUCATION, AND (4) GUIDELINES FOR FURTHER RESEARCH. Descriptors: Audiovisual Aids, Comparative Education, Educational Objectives, Educational Opportunities

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